How can I understand time sequence in “Bit.cmp”

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How can I understand time sequence in “Bit.cmp”

Desmond.Song



Although I draw a picture of the "Bit.cmp",but I have two question flowing:

1. “0+”、“1+”、“2+” is a high level or a rising edge ?
    The "out" value is change at “0+”、“1+”、“2+”rising edge or not ?

2. If  “0+”、“1+”、“2+” is a high level state, what the value of the out should be when the “0+”、“1+”、“2+” is in a low level, hold the value before or not?

Who can help me , sorry for my poor English, thanks in advance!
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Re: How can I understand time sequence in “Bit.cmp”

cadet1620
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Desmond.Song wrote
I have two question flowing:

1. “0+”, “1+”, “2+” is a high level or a rising edge ?
    The "out" value is change at “0+”, “1+”, “2+” rising edge or not ?

2. If  “0+”, “1+”, “2+” is a high level state, what the value of the out should be when the “0+”, “1+”, “2+” is in a low level, hold the value before or not?

Who can help me , sorry for my poor English, thanks in advance!
This is confusing because clock "edges" and "levels" are part of the physical implementation of sequential logic, not part of the logical implementation. In the logical abstraction, you should think of the clock as a periodic event.

In the drawings in the book and the lecture slides, the physical clock is shown as falling edge triggered.  See figure 3.5, for example.

In the Hardware Simulator, "tick" and "tock" are events. "tick" occurs in the center of a clock period, and "tock" occurs between time periods.
"tock" is the abstract clock event that triggers the sequential logic.

At the "tick" command, combinational logic is evaluated, but sequential logic is not updated.
The time changes from (n) to (n)+.

At the "tock" command, combinational logic is evaluated, and sequential logic is updated.
The time changes from (n)+ to (n+1).

Here's an HDL and test script that exposes the signal between the Mux and the DFF and soes extra outputs after the "set" commands that change the "in" and "load" inputs. It better shows when things are changing.
  BitX.hdl
  BitX.cmp
Here's the test output, with some notes.
| time | in  |load |dffin| out |
    initial values
| 0    |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |
    not loading a 1
| 0    |  0  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 0    |  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 0+   |  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  tick, output;
| 0+   |  0  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 0+   |  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 1    |  1  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  tock, output;
    loading a 1
| 1    |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 1    |  1  |  1  |  1  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 1+   |  1  |  1  |  1  |  0  |  tick, output;
| 1+   |  0  |  0  |  0  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 1+   |  1  |  1  |  1  |  0  |  set, eval, output;
| 2    |  1  |  1  |  1  |  1  |  tock, output;
    not loading a 0
| 2    |  1  |  1  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 2    |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 2+   |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  tick, output;
| 2+   |  1  |  1  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 2+   |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 3    |  0  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  tock, output;
    loading a 0
| 3    |  1  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 3    |  0  |  1  |  0  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 3+   |  0  |  1  |  0  |  1  |  tick, output;
| 3+   |  1  |  0  |  1  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 3+   |  0  |  1  |  0  |  1  |  set, eval, output;
| 4    |  0  |  1  |  0  |  0  |  tock, output;

All of the changes to "in" and "load" are caused by "set" commands in the test script. They show that the value of "dffin" does not affect the DFF except when the "tock" command occurs.

--Mark
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Re: How can I understand time sequence in “Bit.cmp”

Desmond
Thanks Mark!You gave me a good and detailed explanation!

I think the device shown in the right of Figure 3.1 should add a clock diagram may be better,like below:


I  do a table to  understand the inside of 'Bit' how things work,I wish I didn't make mistake.
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