Programming in LISP/Scheme/Racket

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Programming in LISP/Scheme/Racket

Josef8429
Hello to everybody, and first of all, THANKS a lot to the People, which made this incredible valuable book possible!!!
I just finished the "Hardware-part" of the book, and now I started looking for the best programming language to finish part two. Initially, I planned to do it with Python (I started a course at Codacademy), but I read also some texts about programming in general, and so LISP/Scheme came in my mind. Is it possible or would you recommend to write the software in part II with LISP/Scheme? For some reason, these languages have a certain fascination to me, so I am planning to learn them. Do I really need a "modern" language like Python, or could I do the Projects of part II with this "ancient" language?
Greeting, Josef
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Re: Programming in LISP/Scheme/Racket

cadet1620
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You are much better off using a modern language that has good support for string parsing and dictionary/map data structures.  I think that you will get caught up in the details of implementing basic functions instead of implementing the tools themselves if you use Lisp/Scheme.

Another reason is that you will be able to expect support from forum users if you are writing in a language that most programmers can read.  Example: I don't write much Java or Ruby, but I can read them well enough to support people writing in them.  The last time I wrote any Lisp was in 1977!

(I wrote my n2t tools in Python.)

--Mark
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Re: Programming in LISP/Scheme/Racket

ivant
In reply to this post by Josef8429
I'm a big fan of the Lisp family of languages. If you want a modern Lisp, then I suggest to take a look at Clojure. It runs on the JVM, has great interoperability with Java and has a very supportive community.

That said, you may find it easier to learn one new thing at a time. If you don't already know Lisp/Scheme/Clojure, you may spend a lot of time searching for trivial things like file IO, instead of thinking how to write the compiler.